United States

Bloqueo de EE.UU. le ha costado a Cuba más de 116.000 millones de dólares

Wednesday, September 17, 2014 - 08:00

Cuba asegura que el embargo de Estados Unidos le ha costado alrededor de $116.000 millones (USD) a la isla desde que se estableció, en 1962. En una declaración realizada el nueve de septiembre en la ONU, la nación caribeña añadió que sólo en el último año el embargo le reportó pérdidas por $3.900 millones  (USD). El viceministro de relaciones exteriores, Abelardo Moreno, aseguró que en promedio Cuba pierde $2.000 millones anuales (USD) como consecuencia de las restricciones de viajes entre los dos países.1

The Multiple Causes of the Border Crisis

Monday, October 20, 2014 - 09:45

Much was written and discussed in the Summer of 2014 about the causes of the migration of thousands of undocumented minors and women with young children from Central America’s Northern Triangle region (Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras) to the United States.1 Many analysts focused on finding "the culprit", the one single cause that provoked the dramatic increase in the number of children arriving at the border and turning themselves to US authorities. 

The Multiple Causes of the Border Crisis

Monday, October 20, 2014 - 09:30

Much was written and discussed in the Summer of 2014 about the causes of the migration of thousands of undocumented minors and women with young children from Central America’s Northern Triangle region (Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras) to the United States.1 Many analysts focused on finding "the culprit", the one single cause that provoked the dramatic increase in the number of children arriving at the border and turning themselves to US authorities. 

Benefits to the US-Cuba Opening

Sunday, December 21, 2014 - 11:00

The surprise opening to Cuba will not necessarily have dramatic effects on either country, though there will be tangible and intangible changes for both.1 For Cuba, the opening brings the prospect for a strong influx of dollars and tourists.  The diplomatic opening does not allow unfettered travel, but it reduces the barriers significantly.  Pitt's Study Abroad program to Cuba had to be canceled last year due to banking restrictions.  That type of problem will surely disappear.  Perhaps, shadowing the new policy with regards to undocumented immigrants, Ob

Paid to Wait: Effects of the Venezuelan Economic Crisis

Friday, January 30, 2015 - 10:30

While much of the United States has been figuratively dancing in the streets about the incredibly low gas prices as of late, others have not been so fortunate to enjoy the plummet. Rather, their economies have been suffering because of it. One such nation is Venezuela, which has recently entered into a recession due to the global lack of demand for oil. Oil has been Venezuela’s primary export for years, which accounts for 96 percent of its foreign currency reception.1 The central Venezuelan bank also noted 63.6 percent inflation between November 2013 and November 2014.

Breaking the Ice, Not Melting It: The U.S. Rapprochement with Cuba

Monday, February 2, 2015 - 10:15

The suitability of the word, “rapprochement,” remains to be seen. U.S. foreign policy towards Cuba took a major swing in December with the proposed resumption of diplomatic relations for the first time in 54 years. In January, Assistant Secretary of State for Western Hemisphere Affairs, Roberta Jacobson, became the highest-ranking U.S. government official to visit the island in 35 years. But despite this improvement and those forthcoming, the events of the past month mean seemingly little—the embargo remains in place, as does one-party rule in Cuba.

North American Regional Security: A Trilateral Framework

Thursday, May 7, 2015 - 14:45

Richard J. Kilroy, a professor of regional and analytical studies at the National Defense University, Abelardo Rodríguez Sumano, a professor of international studies and international security at the University of Guadalajara, and Todd S. Hataley, an adjunct professor at the Royal Military College of Canada and research fellow at the Centre for International and Defense Policy at Queen’s University, discuss the security relations between the United States, Canada, and Mexico in North American Regional Security: A Trilateral Framework.

A 54 Year Old Vestige of the Cold War Finally Thaws

Tuesday, August 25, 2015 - 13:15

On August 15, 2015, Secretary of State John Kerry, was the first US secretary of state to visit Cuba in 70 years. His visit marks the historic end of sour relations between the US and Cuba and the re-opening of the US embassy in Havana. As he addressed the crowd, in both English and Spanish, he talked about the possibility of lifting the 54-year-old trade embargo, as well as the restoration of a true democratic system on the island.

Property Rights in Cuba, A Lurking Legal Nightmare

Wednesday, August 26, 2015 - 13:15

The year is 1959. Imagine you are an American tourist. During your stay, you withdraw money from an American-owned bank, use American-owned electricity, smoke American-grown tobacco, use American-owned phone lines, buy beachwear at an American-owned store, and sleep at an American-owned hotel. Where would you guess you are vacationing?

If your guess is somewhere in the United States––Florida, perhaps––you’re within 200 miles of being correct.

Cultural and Political Factors in the Development of the Nonprofit Sector in the US and L. America

Monday, July 6, 2015 - 10:00

Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) proliferated due to the inability of governments to provide solutions to problems such as extreme poverty, shortage of health systems and education, lack of basic services, and the bureaucracy of state institutions. The development of these organizations began in various regions, including Latin America. However, cultural and political factors of Latin American societies have determined a path for the development of these organizations, a path that is markedly different from that in the United States.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - United States