A Woman's Place

March 23, 2017

On March 8, 2017 most of the world celebrated International Women’s day. And while this celebration has seldom existed without controversy, this year the internet exploded as social media watched and compared two very distinct speeches from world leaders.[1]

All They Wanted? Presidents, Political Support, and Agency Design in Costa Rica

October 19, 2016

Presidents want public institutions that give them ample control of bureaucracy. Conversely, members of Congress purposefully choose to place new agencies outside presidents’ control as a way of shielding those agencies from presidential influence. These claims are two well-known assumptions in the literature on agency design.

Guatemala Elections 2015: A Brief Overview

October 5, 2016

This upcoming September, eligible Guatemalans will be voting for several heads of state including President, Vice President, 158 Congress deputies, and 338 mayors.  With increasing rates of poverty, crime, and violence, the next wave of elected officials will play a major role in the country’s direction and future.  Perhaps the most important of these will be the selection of the president-elect and the agenda he or she pursues.  However, the pool of hopeful candidates (as can be seen below) appears less-than-ideal.

Argentina Prepares for Pivotal Election

October 4, 2016

In Argentina voting is obligatory for all citizens between the ages of 18 and 69. The Argentine voting process requires that the first-place candidate win more than 45 percent of the valid vote or win at least 40 percent of the valid vote and finish more than 10 percent ahead of the second-place candidate. If neither of these outcomes is reached on October 25, a runoff election between the top two candidates from the first round will be held on November 22.

Where the Women Lead

October 10, 2016

If Bill Clinton had been president of a Latin American country, then it would be statistically probable that Hillary Clinton––a Yale educated lawyer, former U.S. Senator, and former U.S. Secretary of State––would have been elected president by now. Some may think this a bold supposition, but it is a supposition rich in historical precedent.

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