Peru

Lava Jato: An Overview

Last year as Brazil geared up to hold the Summer 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, a huge corruption scandal hit the country: “Operação Lava Jato”, or “Operation Car Wash”. After much turmoil and international attention, many thought the scandal would subside with the new year. However, this has not been the case. And the scandal is still making headlines over a year since it first began, having become clear that it involves more than just Brazil.

Populism in the West: Alive and Kickin'

It has been a while since a strikingly populist candidate has been a major contender in a  presidential election in the United States. Many think of William Jennings Bryan, the three-time nominee of the democratic party at the end of the 1800s, as one of the only other strongly populist presidential candidates in American history (Ramone, 2010). President Trump’s campaign can fairly be described as populist through his rhetoric against the elites on Capitol Hill, his appeal to working class voters, and most importantly his outsider status as a non-politician.

Recall Referendums in Peru: a Political Weapon for Bad Losers

Wednesday, March 1, 2017 - 07:00

The direct recall referendum – a bottom-up mechanism of direct democracy (MDD) activated by signature collection among citizens and designed to remove an elected authority from office – has become one of the most intensively used mechanisms of citizen participation in South America, particularly in the Andean countries. To give some examples, between 1997 and 2013, more than 5,000 recall referendums were activated against democratically elected authorities from 747 Peruvian municipalities (45.5 percent of all municipalities).

Chinatown in Peru? A Brief Look of the Chinese Diaspora in Latin America

Wednesday, January 18, 2017 - 08:00

Latin America may be the last place you would expect to see someone who is Chinese. Yet surprisingly, scattered around Latin America, there are many pockets of Chinese immigrants, many of whom consider these nations home. In the areas where there are large Chinese populations, you may even find a Chinatown or un barrio chino.

Collecting Corn: Why do Latin American Countries have more varieties of corn than the United States?

Friday, January 6, 2017 - 08:30

To many, the topic of plant varieties holds little interest. However, in countries like Mexico, the many different types of corn cultivated in the past are deeply ingrained in the culture, history, and traditions today. Corn originated in Mexico, and the beginnings of its cultivation nearly 9,000 years ago completely changed the way people eat1. Civilizations like the Maya, Olmec, Aztec, and Inca all have gods and legends that involve corn.

Pitt Hosts International Symposium on Andean Writer Gamaliel Churata

Tuesday, November 15, 2016 - 13:00

Last week I had the exciting opportunity to sit in on portions of an international symposium hosted by the University of Pittsburgh on Peruvian author Gamaliel Churata. The two-day long event titled Gamaliel Churata: Envisioning the Circulation of Andean Epistemologies in the Age of Globalization brought together writers and scholars from all over the world. Among them were the university’s own Ariel C. Armony, Senior Director of International Programs and Director of the University Center for International Studies; Scott J.

#NiUnaMenos: Un Movimiento Contra la Violencia Machista

Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 13:45

El 10 de octubre, Lucía Pérez, una argentina de 16 años fue brutalmente violada y asesinada en la ciudad de Mar del Plata. Esto ha llevado a una protesta masiva convocada en Argentina en contra de los femicidios (o asesinatos de mujeres por razones de género) en particular  y contra la violencia de género en general. De hecho, también hubo protestas en ciudades de toda América Latina y también en Europa y Estados Unidos por este y otros casos recientes (BBC Mundo, 2016). ¿Cuál es la historia de violencia de género en América Latina, y qué es el movimiento #NiUnaMenos?

After the Violence Abated: The Aftermath of Sendero Luminoso

Thursday, January 23, 2014 - 15:30

By the mid-1980s, many of the anti-communist military regimes that plagued the southern region of Latin American began to dwindle, allowing these nations to enter a stage of remission. But as part of the Latin American body was cured of the disease of political violence, others were newly exposed to the infectious disease. And this time, the other side attacked with a vengeance. In Peru, Maoist, Marxist, communist groups attacked the nation’s indigenous community leaving a path of devastating loss.

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